Image from page 153 of “Our deportment; or, The manners, conduct and dress of the most refined society; including forms for letters, invitations, etc., etc. Also, valuable suggestions on home culture and training” (1885) – Detroit Picture

Identifier: ourdeportmentor00youn
Title: Our deportment; or, The manners, conduct and dress of the most refined society; including forms for letters, invitations, etc., etc. Also, valuable suggestions on home culture and training
Year: 1885 (1880s)
Authors: Young, John H
Subjects: Etiquette
Publisher: Detroit, Mich. [etc.] F.B. Dickerson & Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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Text Appearing Before Image:
see them to their carriages, unless overcoats andhats are on for departure. When balls are given, if the weather is bad, an awningshould be provided for the protection of those passingfrom their carriages to the house. In all cases, a broadpiece of carpet should be spread from the door to thecarriage steps. Gentlemen should engage their partners for theapproaching dance, before the music strikes up. In a private dance, a lady cannot well refuse to dance t* 7>ii,Miinwn.n,,.!,..;,!!,)!,,! i ,,.,,>;,i,,i1,.il,-i1fii,^l/>if>ii,i,M)1ilft!v«n^j,f,Mil:,ii.i ,,!,> !,,■ i,»i ,■!),^ -ol.MuouMuM.Ml.M^t.MuXUMnMWI.Ml.M^U.MWM.MuM.Ml.-ll^l.Ml^ljMuMtnuMlMuMHX^ lMliMlMli«MlUl(l||Hl«*lttf 144 RECEPTIONS, PASTIES AND BALLS. with any gentleman who invites her, unless she has aprevious engagement. If she declines from weariness,the gentleman will show her a compliment by abstainingfrom dancing himself, and remaining with her while thedance progresses.

Text Appearing After Image:
»«,»««M*U»M»|MtMI.M»Mi,M»<MtM»i»l,MliM»M»«UW«t,MMUM«liM»<«Mn»l»l»<liriUM,fn<«in»l»MUMi^»ifl|<«l«MH«n/<l }(!!,»«,<«l«M»<>»<«I.Ml<««1Ml<»l«MuMl<MiMlM||M1JI||MtMHM«MHMit| CHAPTER XII. HE manners of a person are clearlyshown by his treatment of the peo-ple he meets in the public streets ofa city or village, in public convey-ances and in traveling generally.The true gentleman, at all times, inall places, and under all circumstan-ces, is kind and courteous to all he meets,regards not only the rights, but the wishesand feelings of others, is deferential towomen and to elderly men, and is everready to extend his aid to those who need it. THE STREET MANNERS OP A LADY. The true lady walks the street, wrapped in a mantleof proper reserve, so impenetrable that insult and coarsefamiliarity shrink from her, while

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Tagged: , bookid:ourdeportmentor00youn , bookyear:1885 , bookdecade:1880 , bookcentury:1800 , bookauthor:Young__John_H , booksubject:Etiquette , bookpublisher:Detroit__Mich___etc___F_B__Dickerson___Co_ , bookcontributor:Smithsonian_Libraries , booksponsor:Smithsonian_Libraries , bookleafnumber:153 , bookcollection:smithsonian

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